Why We Do It

The NavigateCancer Foundation was formed to promote quality cancer care by providing cancer care navigation services to:
  • reduce gaps in cancer care and services that exist across the entire cancer spectrum.
  • reduce the disparity of cancer services among different segments of the national community.
  • decrease the impact of shrinking health care resources on cancer patients and their families.
  • provide easily accessible cancer care guidance for all cancer patients and their families.

The fundamental tenet of the NavigateCancer Foundation is the belief that all cancer patients require and deserve accessible, quality cancer care.  Unfortunately, gaps in cancer care and services exist across the entire cancer care spectrum which make it difficult for some segments of the national community to access quality cancer care. The mission of the foundation is to reduce the disparity of cancer services and to decrease the impact of shrinking health care resources on cancer care.
 
The NavigateCancer Foundation was formed to promote quality cancer care through personalized, professional, and expert guidance.
  • Cancer patients need to know what quality cancer care should be.
  • Cancer patients need to know the right questions to ask.
  • Cancer patients need help in weighing options and information.
  • Cancer patients need to know when to ask for a second opinion.
  • Cancer patients need individualized patient education. Cancer treatment is complex and individualized and some education materials are quickly outdated or personally irrelevant. Group education falls short; there is no more “one size fits all”.
  • Cancer patients need guidance when reviewing internet information. (Web information lacks proper context and it also is quickly outdated or even contain misinformation.)
  • Cancer patients need a treatment based upon a “holistic” approach and not just focused on the tumor.
The NavigateCancer Foundation was formed to reduce the disparity of cancer services among different segments of the national community by providing easily accessible, confidential, quality cancer guidance to anyone regardless of race, socioeconomic status, education level, geography or their ability to pay. 
  • Health disparities continue to exist in cancer incidence and survival among racial and ethnic groups.  7,8 
  • Those with low income and those that are uninsured are more likely to be diagnosed with cancer at later stages of disease, receive substandard clinical care and services and die from cancer.  7,8
  • Those that live in rural areas and have decreased access to quality cancer care have worse outcomes.  7,8 
  • Death rates from cancer are twice as high in both men and women of any race that are less educated (less than 12 years of education). 8 
  • Racial and ethnic minorities receive a lower quality of cancer care as compared with whites even when insurance, income, age and severity of conditions are the same. 8 
The NavigateCancer Foundation was formed to decrease the impact of shrinking health care resources on your cancer care.
  • Projected increase in incidence of new cancer patients to double by 2050 due to an increase in aging and the growing U.S. population.1,2,3
  • Potential shortage of cancer specialists; oncologists, surgeons and radiation doctors to take care of an increasing number of cancer patients and survivors.4,5,6
  • Potential shortage of nurses to take care of increasing number of cancer patients and survivors. 
  • Demand for oncology services is expected to increase 48% between 2005 and 2020. Projected shortfall of cancer services by 2020.4
  • Insurance premiums have soared as compared to worker’s wages and overall inflation.8
  • Uninsured numbers continue to rise (46.5  million people between 18-65: 2006).8 
The NavigateCancer Foundation  provides easily accessible, confidential, quality cancer care navigation services to anyone regardless of race, socioeconomic status, education level, geography or their ability to pay.

 
 

Sources:
1.        Hayat, M., Howlader, N., Reichman, M., Edwards, B. (2007). Cancer statistics, trends, and multiple primary cancer analyses from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program.  The Oncologist Vol.12  Issue 1         
2.        Yancik R., Ries,
Lynn, A. (2004). Cancer in older persons: an international issue in an aging world.  Seminars in Oncology. Vol.31 Issue 2      
3.        Edwards, B. et al. (2002). Annual report to the nation on the status of cancer, 1973-1999, featuring implications of age and aging on the
U.S. cancer burden.
4.        Erikson, C., Salsberg, E., Forte, G., Bruinooge, S., Goldstein, M. (2007). Future Supply and Demand for Oncologists: Challenges to assuring access to oncology services. Journal of Oncology Practice, Vol.3 No. 2 pp.79-86
5.        Etzioni, D., Liu, J., Maggard, M., O’Connee, J., Ko, C. (2003). Workload Projections for Surgical Oncology: Will We Need More Surgeons? Annals of Surgical Oncology 10:1112-1117

6.        “Growth and Aging of the U.S. Population will cause a surge in demand”- The Federal Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) (2006)

7.        David K. Espey, Xiao-Cheng Wu, Judith Swan, Charles Wiggins, Melissa A. Jim, Elizabeth Ward, Phyllis A. Wingo, Holly L. Howe, Lynn A. G. Ries, Barry A. Miller, Ahmedin Jemal, Faruque Ahmed, Nathaniel Cobb, Judith S. Kaur, Brenda K. Edwards. (2007). Annual report to the nation on the status of cancer, 1975-2004, featuring cancer in American Indians and Alaska Natives. Cancer Volume 110 Issue 10 , Pages 2119 - 2362

8.        American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts & Figures 2008.
Atlanta: American Cancer Society;2008.
 

Kent C.
Lymphoma Survivor, North Carolina


"My nurse consultant provided me with confidence to beat my disease. She was there for me throughout my journey to answer questions and help me ask the right questions to my doctors. She was the best information source and explained everything in very clear layman's language. The service is invaluable. I cannot express in words what NavigateCancer has meant to me and my family."
- Don F.
Lymphoma Survivor, North Carolina



NavigateCancer is hope and guidance for cancer patients and their families.